Friday, July 10, 2015

Disturbed's David Draiman about recording new album Immortalized in secret: "'We wanted people to be caught off guard"


Disturbed's David Draiman recently talked with KISW, you can read some excerpts.

Draiman said: "Isn't there something amazing about getting a really nice surprise? There's something… even the built-in momentum of surprising someone. There definitely was method to that madness. We wanted people to be caught off guard, we wanted people to be shocked. We wanted people to be pleasantly surprised, and for that surprise to fuel fervor, hopefully, and hopefully it's building to that."

Draiman said plans a secret for more than a year was no easy task. "It took a lot of effort to do that, a lot of white lies, and non-disclosure agreements and story telling… a lot of family and friends getting pissed off at you because you won't really tell 'em everything that's going on. So it was a burden that I'm glad I no longer have to carry. And the surprise factor has definitely seemed to work. It was part of our plan all along to, kind of, come out of nowhere. We didn't know whether or not we would be able to accomplish it, because it was one hell of a challenge, but we were able to pull it off somehow, and I think that the results are speaking for themselves."

Draiman also shot down rumors that Disturbed's 2011 decision to take a break was fueled by internal strife: "The one beautiful thing about our camp is that we've always stayed family, we've always been on good terms with each other. And that was the beautiful thing about recording 'Immortalized' in Las Vegas. People would be, like, 'There are so many people coming through Las Vegas. Why there? You shouldn't be seen there.' Yeah, but you know what?! How unusual is it to see a member from the band Disturbed partying in Vegas? It's not something completely out of left field, and we're actually friends with one another, so seeing us together in Vegas is also not completely out of left field. So it kind of gave us what we like to refer to as 'plausible deniability.'"